Site logo

Two-tier or not two-tier, that is the problem

NEWS STORY
18/05/2009

Ahead of tomorrow's court hearing in Paris, where Ferrari will attempt to prevent the FIA from changing the rules, namely in terms of the proposed budget cap, there is widespread confusion as to the two-tier formula for 2010.

Speaking after Friday's meeting, Bernie Ecclestone said the idea of a two-tier system had been scrapped, however, if this were to be true it would most likely mean the demise of the cornerstone of the FIA's plans for the future of the sport, the introduction of new teams into F1.

"I think the most important thing that upset everybody, and which they did not like, was this two-tier technical system," Ecclestone told the BBC, "so I think it has been agreed that we should not have that.

The (other) F1 supremo continued: "The two-tier system is out of the window. I always thought that was a bit stupid. It was important to get rid of it. There has been an agreement in principle. Everyone will have the same regulations.

"I think everybody is more or less happy with the budget cap, although just how much," he added. "They will go with it higher, maybe it will be lower. It's just a case of sorting it out. I am confident all the teams will still be racing next year."

If the FIA is determined to go ahead with its agenda of bringing new teams into the sport, new teams that will have a much smaller operating budget than the big guns, then without some sort of two-tier system which would allow them to be competitive one fails to see what incentive there would be in entering the sport.

Those new teams that have already said they will be submitting entries for the 2010 championship have admitted that it is the £40m budget cap and the revised technical regulations which have tempted them into the notoriously murky and costly world of F1.

Announcing its decision to enter F1 in 2010, Lola said: "The WMSC decisions relating to cost-capping and the provision of revised technical regulations to facilitate the entry of new teams into Formula One should be embraced. This is not only prudent considering the backdrop of global economics but also taking into account the need for new teams to be able to compete credibly against long established entrants."

Putting this issue aside however, as Ferrari begins its legal challenge, one should also pay close attention to the point made clear by Pitpass' business editor, Chris Sylt, namely that according to the European Commission the FIA's role in F1 should be merely to enforce the rules not to write them.

LATEST NEWS

more news >

RELATED ARTICLES

LATEST IMAGES

galleries >

  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images

POST A COMMENT

or Register for a Pitpass ID to have your say

Please note that all posts are reactively moderated and must adhere to the site's posting rules and etiquette.

Post your comment

READERS COMMENTS

 

No comments posted as yet, would you like to be the first to have your say?

Share this page

X

Copyright © Pitpass 2002 - 2022. All rights reserved.

about us  |  advertise  |  contact  |  privacy & security  |  rss  |  terms