Site logo

Could solar power be the answer?

NEWS STORY
14/03/2007

Although the very thought of vast amounts of energy being used to allow night races, thereby allowing a few inhabitants of this endangered planet the opportunity of having their cake and eating it - at the expense of the rest of us - there could be a solution at hand.

In November 2002, it was revealed that a joint venture between the Australian National University and Origin Energy had developed a new type of solar cell with the potential to revolutionise the global solar power industry.

Speaking at the unveiling of the Sliver Cell (TM) - see, it's got something in common with Bernie already! - Professor Andrew Blakers, Director of the ANU Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, said: "A solar panel using Sliver Cell (TM) technology needs the equivalent of two silicon wafers to convert sunlight to 140 watts of power. By comparison, a conventional solar panel needs about 60 silicon wafers to achieve this performance.

"By dramatically reducing the amount of expensive pure silicon, the largest cost in solar panels today, this new technology represents a major advance in solar power technology," he added.

"Origin Energy has worked with ANU's Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems for several years," said Origin Energy's Executive General Manager, Generation, Andrew Stock, "investing more than $6 million in research to discover a way to harness the sun's power at much lower cost.

"Due to the economy and flexibility of Sliver Cells (TM), we believe this technology will play an important role in the future wide-spread adoption of solar power. Sliver Cell (TM) technology is an excellent example of the way Australian researchers can work with Australian industry to innovate a product that leads the world."

The new technology reduces costs in two main ways - by using much less expensive silicon for similar efficiency and power output, and needing less capital to build a solar panel plant of similar capacity.

So look at it this way. Formula One and indeed the Australian Grand Prix Corporation could pull off a dramatic PR exercise, getting their night race whilst giving industrial-power solar light the ideal showcase.

There might be a lot of hot air emanating from the Australian Grand Prix Corporation and certain parts of the F1 paddock, but there's no shortage of sunshine in Melbourne, or Singapore.

For once, when it comes to new technology, Bernie need not be left in the dark!

Discuss.

LATEST NEWS

more news >

Motorsport Memorabilia 300

RELATED ARTICLES

LATEST IMAGES

galleries >

  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images
  • Pitpass.com latest F1/Formula 1 images

POST A COMMENT

or Register for a Pitpass ID to have your say

Please note that all posts are reactively moderated and must adhere to the site's posting rules and etiquette.

Post your comment

READERS COMMENTS

 

No comments posted as yet, would you like to be the first to have your say?

Share this page

X

Copyright © Pitpass 2002 - 2022. All rights reserved.

about us  |  advertise  |  contact  |  privacy & security  |  rss  |  terms