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The German GP Podcast

NEWS STORY
23/07/2014

Tired of leaving the rants to Glen 'Crompo' Crompton, Mat Coch (who allegedly joined the show from a telephone box, or possibly toilet, somewhere) expresses his concerns over the standard of marshalling in Hockenheim, a view shared by Editor Chris Balfe who branded the handling of Adrian Sutil's stricken Sauber as disgraceful.

Crompo is uncharacteristically forgiving and instead is left wistfully reminiscing Jean Alesi's helmet before pointing out the flaws in Bernie Ecclestone's business model.

Balfe agrees, saying no matter what the teams claim fans are voting with their feet, as evidenced by swathes of empty seats in the grandstands at what is historically one of the better attended races on the calendar.

Bringing things back on track, Felipe Massa's opening lap escapades caught the team’s eye with Balfe asking whether the Brazilian should be considering calling time on his career. That aside, Williams renaissance earns the Grove squad praise in a year where they look to be genuine front runners.

Somehow Crompo believes the race left him unimpressed, a view not shared by his colleagues who point out the entertaining racing further down the order.

Not satisfied with just one rant, Coch embarks on a second as he claims the sport regulates against true innovation in the interest of producing a better television product.

Interlinked suspension is also discussed, with questions asked about the timing of the FIAs announcement in terms of banning the system, seemingly, yet again, moving the goal posts in an attempt to manipulate the desired result.

At 19-minutes the team covers a lot of ground, from comparing Formula 1 to late night television advertising to discussing brake-by-wire, not to mention Crompo taking great delight in proving Coch wrong. Again.

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READERS COMMENTS

 

1. Posted by jasman, 24/07/2014 9:43

"Please tell,who in the cast plays Curly, Moe, and Larry respectively? ;-)"

Rating: Neutral (0)     Rate comment: Positive | NegativeReport this comment

2. Posted by TheBucketOfTruth, 23/07/2014 22:03

"Not that the FRIC they use in F1 would actually trickle down to road cars per se, but it is a technology that has real world applications. Audi's first RS6 had DRC (dynamic ride control) which was a connected system that would control the shocks to limit squat, dive, and roll in the car's suspension. It was very failure prone, but is a good example of road car applications for this type of technology.

The FIA sends a letter basically saying that FRIC may no longer be considered legal because they can't actually change the regulations mid-season without all of the teams agreeing. Is this correct? Their way around it was lumping FRIC in with the catch all regulation of being a "moveable aerodynamic device." I just wish they would stop meddling mid-season. Last year they had a spec of tire which teams built cars around. Some teams got it right (Force India) while others got it wrong (Sauber). It seems cruel to see those respective teams' fortunes flip flop when the FIA and Pirelli screw up. Renault's mass damper in 2006 is the best parallel for this season's change, and was an equally maddening decision. I'm glad Renault was still able to hold off Ferrari. In 2003 they changed how tire grooves were measured mid-season after Michelin was being clever with wear patterns.

If the teams come up with something clever, but it is still within the regulations, leave it alone. If you really don't like it then ban it between seasons. Messing with the spec of the cars mid-season is unsporting and reeks of poor governance."

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